Practicing Intentions In Our Daily Lives

Zen drop falls into the water with sunset on background

Intentions help us gain clarity. They are tools for maintaining balance and order, tools to help you connect with the spiritual being within and maintain a sense of peace and clarity amid the external chaos and noise. Setting an intention or two each morning is a highly beneficial practice. Write this intention down or say it out loud. Remember that you can hold onto the intention for today or make it part of your daily practice. Focus on how you see yourself today and how you can be your most authentic self.

Here is a quote that I use to set my day and connect with my authentic self:

“I am responsible for the growth and maintenance of mindfulness in my own life. Each day is an opportunity for me to discover deeper truths about myself. Every moment is an invitation for me to grant others the space they need to be themselves. Within me exists a world of awe and splendor, and every morning is a reminder of my innate obligation to participate in my own majesty. This life is my inheritance as a human being and I will claim it by living as fully as I possibly can through mindful and compassionate participation.”

“May any reward I receive be recycled through my service to others.”

Here are some basic intentions you can set for yourself each morning:

  • I will identify and honor my needs.
  • When I notice my defense mechanisms present, I will be awareand take the next right action.
  • I will make time for myself, for self-awareness even if it’s just five minutes.
  • I will have at least one genuine conversation.
  • I will nourish my body and eat one warm meal.
  • I will truly listen when someone else is talking to me instead of planning what I want to say next.
  • I will disconnect from my electronics 30 minutes before bed.
  • I will take a moment of gratitude.
  • I will do some form of physical activity for at least 45 minutes.
  • I will light a candle or burn incense when I get home to ground myself.
  • When I notice my mind thinking about the future, I will bring myself back to the present moment.
  • I recognize that I have flaws, and I will embrace them with love and forgiveness.
  • I will take actions not to isolate myself.
  • I will practice forgiveness to those I am angry at or feel resentful toward.
  • I will be mindful, especially when I eat, shower, brush my teeth, and walk.
  • I will recognize the labels and judgments I have and practice releasing them.
  • I will honor myself and let go of the need to people-please, even when it makes me uncomfortable.
  • I will ask for what I want and need with no shame.
  • I will talk back to my inner critic when it wants to keep me insecure and paralyzed in fear.
  • I will open my heart and mind to learning something new today.

Dr. Mari Richko has been working in the holistic health field for more than 20 years applying her background in Integrative Medicine, Body-Centered Psychotherapy, Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Body Therapies such as Zen Shiatsu. Mari is well known in the addiction community for her work in enhancing recovery for those suffering from mental and physical ailments. She utilizes mindfulness, body awareness, Internal Family Systems, and yoga psychology in her work with clients. Mari is the owner of The Center for Authentic Living and Director of Programs and Integrative Services at The Awakening Center. She is an avid lecturer on combining psychotherapy and the Five Elements of Chinese Medicine as an educational tool for recovery. She also runs the YogaTalk therapy group every other Sunday at The Awakening Center.